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Honey Journal #24

Saturday, May 16, 2009

Honey Journal #24

Name: Fowler’s Texas Cream Honey

You can buy it: On the Internet here

Country: Texas, USA

Color: Light sandstone

Flavor: A swirl of carmel taffy and chocolat with a sweet Texas grapefruit kick.

Consistency: Buttery

Fragrance: Citrus and Chocolate

IMG_0896.jpg Fowler's Honey image by allen1844

Notes:

This honey was sent to me by a listener from Texas who, I’m proud to report, has become a honey aficionado while reading this journal. This is his favorite honey and it’s not hard to see why. Although the taste isn’t conventional, it is compelling. I keep finding myself going to back to this honey for just one more taste. Don’t expect this jar to be around long, if you decide to sample it.

The honey is harvested by the Fowler Family in La Vernia, Texas, population, 931, outside of San Antonio who rightly take great pride in their small business and have put up an excellent web site.

We have a great station in San Antonio, 930AM KLUP I noticed checking the KLUP web site that they have an iPhone app, so that you can listen to Dennis and the other hosts on their station on your iPhone. Theoretically, this should mean that you can listen to Dennis on your iPhone from anywhere in the world. KLUP replays the show in the evening. If someone tests this app and it works, please let me know at allen@dennisprager.com. I don’t have an iPhone or I’d do it myself.

Another aside: The Texas grapefruit reference reminds me of my late, beloved Uncle Ben, my mother’s brother. Ben was one of those guys you just wanted to hang around with: charming, unflappable, a pied piper without try to being one. I was crazy about him. His personality was personified in his picture perfect golf swing. We’d go out to the course together and he’d send the ball flying down the middle of fairway for 200 plus yards, hole after hole. He made the game, like everything he did, look easy.

It wasn’t always so, however. As a young man just out of the army, he failed at business after business. A friend suggested that he come to El Paso, Texas where, this friend assured him, there was a lot of opportunity. This was El Paso in the early 50′s, not exactly a booming metropolis, but he had nothing to do lose so he went. And he liked it. He came back to Chicago and told his wife, my Aunt Dolly, that they were moving to southwest Texas. Dolly, who came from a prominent Chicago family, said there was no way she was going to some God-forsaken place where there was no culture, no deli and 110 in the shade, if there was any shade.

Ben’s mind was made up. El Paso was the future: Chicago was the past. If she stayed, they were finished. She went. Ben quickly got a job selling pants for a company very few people had heard about it outside the western states; that company was Levi Strauss.

Ben was a good salesman and made a nice living. He used a good chunk of the money he made to buy stock in his employer. He believed in the company and the product. They treated him well. Then, in the early sixties, something unexpected happened. Levi jeans became the uniform of every college kid and then high school kid in the country. In those days, there was no competition, no competing brands. You didn’t buy jeans, you bought Levis. You’re only decision was whether you bought button fly or zipper.

By this point, Ben was the number one salesperson for the company and had amassed a lot of shares of the company stock. He and Dolly became prominent citizens in El Paso, a town that had started growing by leaps and bounds, but not before Ben had purchased a nice chunk of local real estate.

This is a very long introduction to my Texas grapefruit story. Ben would visit us in Chicago every couple of years. And when he came he would bring a box of grapefruit with him – Texas ruby reds. He would brag that they were the sweetest you could find anywhere, much sweeter than those tasteless yellow ones from Florida (his description).

So, when I tasted that grapefruit kick in this honey, it reminded me of my Uncle Ben, may he rest in peace. Texas grapefruit always does.

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